How Holiday Hiring Could Solve Full-Time Recruiting Challenges

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The National Retail Federation has predicted that holiday spending, including online sales, will increase 3.7% this year to $630.5 billion. That means companies of all sizes are staffing up for the holiday surge.

If your company is among the 1 in 3 employers projected to add holiday staff this year, use these tips to make the process smoother, faster, and a potential recruiting channel for year-round hiring needs.

Plan For Full-Time Hiring Needs Before You Need To

If you know your company may need additional help when the holiday season is over, take this into consideration when planning your seasonal staffing needs. Think of the qualifications you'd want in a full-time hire and keep them in mind when you're recruiting for seasonal hiring. Performance during a temporary assignment gives you valuable on-the-job performance insight before you commit to a full-time hire.

Creatively And Strategically Post Your Listings

Thanks to the Internet, there's an endless supply of job posting channels, in addition to your local newspaper. Craigslist. Monster. CareerBuilder. LinkedIn and other social media sites. Niche sites like Snagajob that connect employers with hourly workers. How do you know what works?

If you've hired seasonal workers before, you know where to post to get the kind of candidates you want. If you haven't, then advertise your job needs where you can, and get creative.

Hiring through social media for example, can be quick and easy, while also yielding high results. Beverages and More Inc. began advertising to fill 1,000 seasonal jobs on social media, and online applications increased by 66%.

And don't forget about college campuses. Earning spring break cash during the holiday break is top of mind for many college students. Sites like WayUp that connect college students with jobs like yours may be a great place for you to find the candidates you want.

Onboarding Still Matters

Onboarding is a critical component of hiring, regardless of company size. The holiday rush presents a challenge, as it may require you to onboard many new people in a short period of time.

You want to your new employees to be knowledgeable and helpful, though, so it's important to train them thoroughly. Nordstrom, for example, is synonymous with stellar customer service because of its incredible onboarding process.

During training, listen to ideas and opinions, understand the motivation of why the employees are working there, and help new employees learn the ropes so they feel like a part of the company. Remember that a temporary employee may return to work for you in a future busy season or even become a full-time employee.

Don't Skip The Background Check

Knowing that employees are temporary may make you want to skip doing a background check. They'll be gone in a few weeks, so why bother? For the same reason you conduct background checks on your regular employees: for the security and safety of your brand, your employees, and your customers.

Running background checks doesn't have to be hard. GoodHire, for example, offers no-contract, pay-per-report services for companies and can automate many compliance steps, including the consent process.

Observe Performance

Seasonal employees are a great way to trial run individuals to see if they will be a good culture fit and a hard working employee. Toys "˜R' Us habitually keeps seasonal workers on full time after the busy season is over, and recommends having department supervisors observe workplace habits of employees. Keeping tabs on who shows up on time, who is attentive to customers, and who takes extra shifts are great ways to spot seasonal hires that would make great full-time employees.

Ask managers who they would recommend for a certain position based on their skills and work ethic. That way, you can leverage your existing talent pool of seasonal workers rather than trying to hire from scratch.

Make It A Good Experience To Get Returning Seasonal Workers

The experience of working for your business, even for a short period of time, will stick with employees. While seasonal workers know the gig is temporary, they're still part of your company while they're there.

Treat them well and make them feel welcome. A good experience may mean they want to work for you again. That means you'll have a ready pool experienced workers next season or fully trained workers who could become full-time staff in the future. Even if they don't return, worker who had a good experience with you could recommend other good candidates in the future.

Hiring for the holidays can be challenging, but there are plenty of great potential candidates looking for work. New employees mean new staff and new ideas. Take advantage of new opinions and insights to help your business to grow in new ways.

Want more hiring tips? Follow us @goodhiretweets #BuildGreatTeams to learn more. "‹

Lauren Small

Lauren Small

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Lauren Small is a content and social media expert who writes about hiring, onboarding, and HR best practices. Lauren comes by her HR insight honestly, having observed the culture at diverse employers Amazon, HubSpot, and GoodHire’s parent company Inflection.

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